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Illicit Connections/Water Quality Concerns 

Storm DrainWhen it rains in urban areas stormwater hits hard surfaces such as paved parking lots, rooftops and roadways instead of soaking into the ground naturally. The stormwater picks up oils, grease, pesticides, fertilizers and even bacteria and viruses from pet waste on its way to the storm drainage system.

 

Stormwater that enters the County’s storm drainage system is not treated at a wastewater treatment facility. Instead it empties directly into creeks, rivers, wetlands and streams, depositing any pollutants picked up along the way. 

 

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), pollution found in stormwater runoff (also referred to as "nonpoint source pollution") is the biggest threat to the quality of the nation’s waterways.  
 
The Stormwater Management Ordinance prohibits illegally dumping, throwing, discharging, or allowing the entrance of substances other than stormwater into the County’s storm drainage system or right-of-way.  Harmful substances which enter the stormwater system are considered illicit discharges. Items such as trash, yard debris and sediment from construction sites are also considered illicit and are prohibited from dumping in the storm drain system or public right-of-way.  Illicit discharges have the potential to cause excessive harm to the environment and private property due to flooding. 
 
 

REPORT POTENTIAL ILLICIT DISCHARGES BY CALLING 803-785-8201 OR COMPLETING THE STORMWATER COMPLAINT FORM AND FORWARDING TO THE STORMWATER DIVISION.

 

Stormwater Complaint Form  
 

News/Updates 

 
Lexington County received a grant from the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control to reduce fecal coliform bacteria levels in the Hollow Creek Watershed near Batesburg-Leesville in Lexington County.  Hollow Creek is a recreational resource for Lexington County and feeds directly into Lake Murray.  The County is working with the Lexington Soil & Water Conservation District, the Natural Resources Conservation Service, Lake Murray Association and Saluda County to restore the watershed.  For more information on the project contact the County’s Stormwater Manager, Sheri Armstrong, at sarmstrong@lex-co.com

 
 

Lexington County Seal