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Public Works/Stormwater Division

storm drainThe Lexington County Stormwater Division is responsible for management of the County’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) Permit.   The stormwater division oversees construction site compliance, floodplain management and water quality programs.  The Division also oversees the implementation of air quality programs and initiatives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

News/Upcoming Events

 

Storm Drain Tagging Month

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 Green is Good for Business Conference  -   Tuesday, September 30, 2014  8:00am to 4:00pm

 

 

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TMDLs: A Costly Regulation, or an Opportunity to Fund Community Improvements?

 

TMDLs: A Costly Regulation, or an Opportunity to Fund Community Improvements?

This article appeared in the July/August 2013 Issue of Stormwater Magazine. It provides information on the Stormwater Division's work in the Hollow Creek Watershed and how the Division is leveraging funds to meet water quality goals.

 

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Twelve Mile Creek Watershed Project 

 

Lexington County was awarded a grant from the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to reduce bacteria levels in the Twelve Mile Creek Watershed between the Town of Gilbert and the Town of Lexington.

 

Twelve Mile Creek runs from the Town of Gilbert, through the Town of Lexington and ends at the Lower Saluda River. The creek has recreational resources such as Gibson Pond Park and tributaries through Virginia HIlton Park. Twelve Mile Creek is impaired due to high levels of fecal coliform bacteria, an indicator of human and animal waste.

 

The project includes promotion of best management practices that help reduce bacteria levels and providing monetary assistance to land owners interested in the project. The project includes:

 

  • Up to 60% cost share assistance to repair/replace failing septic systems
  • Up to 60% cost share assistance to farmers who install conservation practices as part of a conservation plan
  • Development of a cooking oil recycling program

Participation in the program is voluntary and interested land owners are encouraged to contact the Lexington County Stormwater Division at 803-785-8201 for more information.

 

Click here to watch a video about proper cooking oil and grease disposal!

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Hollow Creek Watershed Project

 

Click on the link below to view a video about the Hollow Creek Watershed Project.

Hollow Creek Video

 

Lexington County was awarded a grant from the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to reduce bacteria levels in the Hollow Creek Watershed located near the Town of Batesburg-Leesville. The goal of the Hollow Creek Watershed Project is to work with local land owners on voluntary projects, which reduce bacteria from agricultural activities, failing septic systems and wildlife.

 

Hollow Creek is a recreational resource for Lexington County, as citizens enjoy fishing, picnicking, and canoeing along the banks of the creek and its tributaries. The watershed feeds directly into Lake Murray, which is directly impacted by the health of the creek. Hollow Creek is impaired due to high levels of fecal coliform bacteria. Fecal coliform are an indicator of human and animal waste.

 

The project includes promotion of best management practices that help reduce bacteria levels and providing monetary assistance to land owners interested in the project. The project will provide up to 60% cost share assistance to livestock farmers to develop conservation plans, up to 60% cost share assistance to homeowners wanting to repair/replace failing septic systems, and education on ways hunting practices can be modified to direct animals away from waterways. Participation in the program is voluntary and interested land owners are encouraged to contact the Lexington County Stormwater Division for more information.

 

Project partners include the Lexington Soil and Water Conservation District, the Natural Resource Conservation Service, Hollow Creek Watershed Conservation District, Lake Murray Association and Saluda County.

 

Septic Repair Application

 

Septic Repair Process

 

Agricultural Application